Hiromi Tsujii (MS, M.A.)

Psychotherapist—Adult Individual & Couples Counseling / Children and/or Families

Ms. Tsujii is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist National Certified Counselor in the U.S. and is a Certified Clinical Psychologist/Licensed Psychologist in Japan.

As a clinician, she is trained and experienced in a wide range of therapeutic modalities including play therapy, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Narrative Exposure Therapy, Circle of Security parenting, mindfulness approach, Narrative therapy, and Collaborative and Dialogical approach, and meets the unique needs of each individual and family.

Issues that may be addressed include behavioral and emotional needs of children and adolescents, ADHD, Autistic Spectrum Disorder, depression, anxiety, trauma, grief, pain and chronic illnesses, co-parenting, and relationship issues for individuals of all ages and their families. Her main interest has been in Collaborative and Dialogical practices.

Hiromi is a National Certified Counselor in the U.S. and is a Certified Clinical Psychologist/Licensed Psychologist in Japan. She earned her master’s in counseling/counselor education from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, and her master’s in marriage and family therapy from California School of Professional Psychology in San Diego, California. For over 25 years, she has been working as a therapist in various settings, including hospitals, schools, and community mental health centers both in the U.S. and in Japan. She has also been teaching counseling and family therapy as a college faculty member and provides clinical supervision for therapists. She is a certified supervisor in Dialogical Approach in couple and family therapy from Finland.

In her free time, she enjoys yoga, gardening, cooking/baking, and hiking.

Key Concepts: play therapy, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Narrative Exposure Therapy, Circle of Security parenting, mindfulness approach, Narrative therapy, Collaborative and Dialogical approach, children and adolescents, ADHD, Autistic Spectrum Disorder, depression, anxiety, trauma, grief, pain and chronic illnesses, co-parenting, relationship issues, hospitals, schools, community mental health centers.

o Play Therapy: a type of therapy typically used for children who struggle with communicating emotional needs or feelings. The goal is to allow the child to express themselves through play, and for the play therapist to help process what the child may be having difficulty articulating verbally. Play therapy can be either nondirective—during which children are able to freely play, or directive—during which the play therapist may guide or assist play.

o Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: a type of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy that aims to process the distress caused by a traumatic situation. Trauma-Focused CBT is used with children, adults, and families (though often used with children) who have experienced trauma (sexual, physical, emotional, etc.), and are struggling in different aspects with the impact of that experience.

o Narrative Exposure Therapy: a type of therapy used for individuals who have experienced a traumatic event or situation, and is a common treatment method for those struggling with PTSD. By having the individual tell the story of the traumatic event or situation and reframe the story while including positive aspects of the individual’s life, the distress due to the traumatic experience may be lessened.

o Circle of Security: an approach to help parents understand and address their child’s needs in order to create a strong parent-child relationship and healthy attachment security.

o Mindfulness: a set of practices based in meditation that centers on bringing attention to the present moment, independent of both the past and the future. The goal is to become aware of thoughts as they arise but not attach judgement to them—noticing thoughts in this way may help reduce anxiety and stress surrounding them.

o Narrative Therapy: a type of therapy that aims to detach an individual from their problems and encourage an objective view of what the individual is going through. The goal is to process live events as stories, and find a new perspective to analyze them and identify potential ways to work through those struggles.

o Collaborative and Dialogical Approach: a type of therapy in which the therapist demonstrates a philosophical stance when conversations are conducted. They engage clients from a learning or non-knowing approach with the client themselves being the expert on their own concerns, preferred outcomes, and goals.