TELL Japan

TELL Eating Disorder Program: Body Project by Dr. Eric Stice

Published on September 4, 2017

In 2010, the TELL Eating Disorder Program was founded with the mission of making the treatment of eating disorders more accessible to the international community. Over the last 7 years, TELL has become one of the leading eating disorder outpatient programs in Japan. By utilizing evidence-based treatments for individuals and families struggling with this serious […]

In 2010, the TELL Eating Disorder Program was founded with the mission of making the treatment of eating disorders more accessible to the international community. Over the last 7 years, TELL has become one of the leading eating disorder outpatient programs in Japan. By utilizing evidence-based treatments for individuals and families struggling with this serious mental illness, TELL has been able to give hope for a brighter future for many. In addition to providing world class treatment, TELL provides and sponsors community events and professional workshops that raise awareness about eating disorders and treatment options.

As part of this mission, TELL is proud to announce that this fall we will be launching The Body Project, a new prevention and intervention program. The Body Project has reached over 3.5 million girls and young women in over 125 counties. TELL is the first organization to make this program available in Japan. By focusing on the creation of body acceptance, the program is able to increase awareness around eating disorders. TELL has chosen to introduce the Body Project to Japan because it has outperformed alternative credible interventions. To date, the Body Project is the only intervention that has been found to significantly reduce future eating disorder onset, produce effects that persisted in a 3-year follow-up, and produced effects that have been replicated by independent research teams.

The Body Project is a facilitator-led group intervention. The participants are encouraged to examine the cost of pursuing the thin ideal by using verbal, written, and behavioral exercises. The program curriculum includes various activities such as group discussions, writing letters to younger girls about avoiding body image concerns, and correcting problem behaviors. These activities result in decreased subscription to the “appearance ideal”. Research has shown that this leads to a reduction in body dissatisfaction, negative mood, dieting, and eating disorder symptoms. Moreover, there is a decreased risk for future eating disorders and an overall improved psychosocial functioning.

Through the implementation of the Body Project, TELL hopes to reduce the suffering that eating disorders cause to both those with the diagnosis and their loved ones. Additionally, we will continue to address the thin-body idealization and body image dissatisfaction that prevails globally and locally in society. Body dissatisfaction is significantly more common than clinical eating disorders and can be equally distressing. Often times, body dissatisfaction compromises the quality of life of the individual. Body dissatisfaction is one of the primary precursors to the development of an eating disorder or eating disorder behavior. By highlighting the issue of body dissatisfaction, the Body Project will allow us to work with individuals before the eating disorder fully sets in.

To kickoff our new project we will have Dr. Eric Stice, the developer of the Body Project, present the latest research in the field of eating disorders. Dr. Stice is a renowned expert in the field of eating disorder prevention and research. His presentation will emphasize identifying risk factors and implementing prevention programs. For more information, please visit http://telljp.com/event/drstice/

If you are interested in implementing the Body Project at your school, organization, or local community, please contact the TELL Eating Disorder Program coordinator Kaori Ogiwara at eatingdisorders@telljp.com

If you are interested in experiencing the Body Project first hand, the first event is scheduled to commence in November.

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